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Good For You! And Good For Me!

I’m mostly getting my news in written form these days, and oh, this news from an Apple compilation features an article from the New York Post that recommends all my favorite foods, even ((take a breath)) chocolate!

LIVING

By The Sun | October 7, 2021 | 2:32pm

Popular herb could help prevent Alzheimer’s, study finds

Looking after your health can help prevent lots of diseases and issues later in life.

Taking care to eat the right things and keep active can lay the groundwork for a healthier future.

While there is no magic pill or superfood that will entirely stop a possible disease in it’s tracks, there are some items that will help to slash your risk.

Alzheimer’s is a devastating disease that affects the patient and their loved ones – and studies have found a few foods that can boost your brain health and help try to prevent developing it.

What is Alzheimer’s disease?

In 2020, as many as 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease, according to the CDC.

A hallmark of the disease is the build-up of amyloid beta proteins in the brain, which causes plaques.

The plaques then result in the loss of connections between nerve cells in the brain – and ultimately the death of those cells and a loss of brain tissue.

Those with Alzheimer’s also have a shortage of key chemicals in the brain, which help transmit messages.

A lack of these chemicals means the brain is unable to process certain messages how it would have previously.

While there is currently no cure for the disease, some treatments can help boost these chemical messages, and ward of some of the symptoms.

What is the popular herb that could cut your risk?

A study found that a naturally occurring compound, fenchol, could have a protective effect against Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers from the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) made this discovery.

They found out of 15 compounds studied, fenchol was the most effective at binding to and activating cell-signaling molecule free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2).

The more signaling there is, the more a protein linked to the development is reduced.

This in turn lowers rates of neuron death and lessens the number of senescent neuronal cells, often dubbed “zombie” cells, and frequently found in Alzheimer’s patient’s brains.

Fenchol can be found in basil, which can be incorporated into plenty of dishes to up your intake of the compound.

Principal investigator Hariom Yadav, PhD, professor of neurosurgery and brain repair at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, said: “Fenchol actually affects the two related mechanisms of senescence and proteolysis.

“It reduces the formation of half-dead zombie neuronal cells and also increases the degradation of (nonfunctioning) Aβ, so that amyloid protein is cleared from the brain much faster.”

Fenchol is also found in fennel, lime and nutmeg.

Other foods that can boost your brain health:

Chocolate can be a great brain food. This is because cacao – the raw, pure version of cocoa – is high in flavonols.

These plant substances are thought to have a powerful antioxidant effect, including for the brain, and have even been researched for their potential to protect against Alzheimer’s disease.

Oily fish such as salmon are high in an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA.

DHA is found in high levels in the grey matter of our brain – proof that we need lots of it for healthy brain function. Studies have suggested that having plentiful supplies of DHA supports learning and memory, as well as IQ.

Research suggests that eating blueberries may be particularly beneficial for our brain too, especially supporting brain health into old age.

This effect is thought to be primarily due to blueberries’ content of polyphenols, which may help to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation that can contribute to brain deterioration.

Eggs are a fantastic food for many reasons – not least for your brain.

The yolks are rich in choline, a vitamin-like substance that’s needed for the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve fibers, including in the brain.

October 7, 2021 Posted by | Aging, Food, Health Issues, News | | Leave a comment

St. Birgitta: As Many Books As They Pleased

From today’s Lectionary, because I am of Swedish descent and because I love that while embracing poverty, the nuns were allowed “as many books as they pleased.”

BIRGITTA OF SWEDEN

Mystic and Prophetic Witness, 1373

Brigitta (Bridget) of Sweden (1303 – 23 July 1373); born as Birgitta Birgersdotter, was a mystic and saint, and founder of the Bridgettines nuns and monks.

The most celebrated saint of Sweden was married at the age of 14 to Ulf Gudmarsson, to whom she bore eight children. In 1344 Ulf died, after wehich Birgitta devoted herself wholly to a life of prayer and caring for the poor and the sick. It was about this time that she developed the idea of establishing the religious community which was to become the Order of the Most Holy Saviour, or the Brigittines. One distinctive feature of the pre-Reformation houses of the Order was that they were double monasteries, with both men and women forming a joint community, though with separate cloisters. They were to live in poor convents and to give all surplus income to the poor. However, they were allowed to have as many books as they pleased.

At the age of ten, Bridget had a vision of Jesus hanging upon the cross. She was so impressed that from that moment the Passion of Christ became the center of her spiritual life. The revelations she had received since childhood became more frequent, and her records of these Revelationes coelestes (“Celestial revelations”) obtained a great vogue during the Middle Ages.These revelations made Bridget something of a celebrity to some and a controversial figure to others.

In 1350, a Jubilee Year, Birgitta braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome accompanied by her daughter, Catherine, and a small party of priests and disciples. This was done partly to obtain from the Pope the authorization of the new Order and partly in pursuance of her self-imposed mission to elevate the moral tone of the age. Birgitta made herself universally beloved in Rome by her kindness and good works. Save for occasional pilgrimages, including one to Jerusalem in 1373, she remained in Rome until her death on 23 July 1373, urging ecclesiastical reform and an end to the Avignon schism.

October 7, 2021 Posted by | Character, Civility, Community, Cultural, Lectionary Readings, Quality of Life Issues, Social Issues, Values, Women's Issues | | 1 Comment